LETTERS FROM LONDON
1. YOU HAVE FAUX FURY FRIENDS:
If you go down to the woods today you’re sure of a big surprise; it’s a zoo out
there.

Britain’s cherished penchant for fancy dress has been replaced by furry dress.
Animal magnetism has a whole new meaning. Foxes, cows, squirrels, zebras,
pigeons, wolves, ad inf. Expect to come upon a six foot dog or a gaggle of
geese or a mob of meerkats at your local Tesco pet aisle.

“Isn’t it just the bees’ knees.”
“Don’t count your chickens, Darling.”
“You look like a dog’s dinner.”
“I don’t give a monkey’s.”
“Well, a leopard can’t change its spots.”
“We’re all birds of a feather now.”
“Oh no. It’s raining cats and dogs.”

You might think that this reverse anthropomorphism originated by way of
babies’ woolly hats with ears. Apparently not. Sweet as those hats are - these
new fuzzy, fleece, pelt wearing populace began (where else) in Japan.
In Tokyo where Ganguro, Japanese street fashion, reveals one’s chosen life
style be it Elvis or Hello Kitty. Kigurumi is costumed characters moving on
beyond posing by making appearances at malls/events/parties.

Last year two lads saw the opportunity to assist their animal-mad- Kigurumi
university friends by importing furry dress for them at a mere £39.99. “The
British are famed for dressing up and, like the Japanese, we're eccentric. You
can pay anything from £500-£2,000 for a bespoke costume. The waiting list for
top costume-makers can be two years."

So it’s not simply the permanent on trend Dolce & Gabbana animal prints  -
more a bit like an underground movement with thousands of Londoners meeting
and greeting, rubbing noses, patting, hugging.

A stunned David Warner exclaimed to Vanessa Redgrave upon waking up to
find himself in a beloved gorilla costume: “I’ve gone all fuuuuuuuurry.”  
Morgan:
A Suitable Case for Treatment
1966.

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